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Category: Clothing

Sweatshirt Refashion- Wrap Front

Sweatshirt Refashion- Wrap Front

The cold weather and shorter days have revealed the “hibernation phase” of my wardrobe. The only thing I really want to wear are sweaters, leggings, and baggy sweatshirts. Since baggy sweatshirts aren’t particularly work appropriate, I’ve made it my mission to transform the simple sweatshirt into something both stylish AND comfortable. Many set-backs and a great deal of time later, we come to the Wrap-Front-Sweatshirt-Refashion!

I give you Exhibit A: a men’s XL sweatshirt I found new at a thrift store. Two features of this sweatshirt are critical to the success of the project. See how the band of fabric at the bottom of the sweatshirt doesn’t scinch and gather the sweatshirt fabric? Instead, the band is about the same size as the base of the sweatshirt and lays flat. Some sweatshirts have a band that gathers in the fabric above it. This causes the fabric of the sweatshirt to poof out and mushroom over the band. WE DON’T WANT THAT for this project. The second critical feature of this sweatshirt is butt coverage. Since I want to wear the sweatshirt with leggings, it’s gotta cover my booty. (Note: I’m about 5’5″, and this XL was just long enough. If you are taller, you may want to look for a men’s “tall” size to get extra length.)

Once you’ve found and washed your sweatshirt, you’re ready to start! In order to turn this pullover sweatshirt into a wrap-front, I started by cutting open the front. To help me create a straight, basically centered cut, I folded the sweatshirt in half. I then used tailor’s chalk to mark along the fold.

After doubled checking the placement of the marks, I cut along the chalk line.

Next, I measured and trimmed the new opening to create a v-neck.

I then hemmed the raw edges to create a finished look. You could skip this step if you didn’t mind a more casual style. (Note: Be sure to use both a stitch and a sewing machine needle designed for knit fabrics!!)

Those cuffs had to go!

Next, it was time to determine the placement of the ties and eyelet that would create our wrap-front. I tried on the sweatshirt and found the length right above my hip bone. At this length, I marked the spot for my eyelet about 1-2 inches forward of the side seam. I then marked this same above-hip-bone length on the new front seams. These marks would be for the ties.

On to the eyelet! I started by ironing a small circle of Pellon fusible interfacing onto the wrong side (the inside) of the sweatshirt under where the eyelet would go. The interfacing helped stabilize and strengthen the stretchy fabric before the eyelet was punched into it. (I guessed at the pellon weight, but the package mentioned that it was good for sportswear and reinforcement of snaps.) I made the pellon circle a little bigger than the size of the eyelet and ironed it on according to the package directions. Now for that eyelet! I bought both the eyelets and applicator tools for size “extra large” 1.1 cm eyelets. I followed the package directions and went outside to do the hammering over towel-covered asphalt. Be sure your surface is flat… or it will take forever.

Next, it was time to sew ties to the markings on the front opening. I used a woven fabric tape that was 3/4″ wide, but you could also use ribbon.

To figure out the lengths of the ties, I tried on the sweatshirt again and practiced wrapping the front opening closed. I used a tape measure to see how long each tie would need to be to wrap around or across my body and tie at the side. My ties were about 45″ and 22″ long, but it’s always good to estimate longer than shorter! I rolled the ends of the ties under and stitched to keep them from raveling. (Note: I should have waited to finish the edges until after sewing on the ties and trying on the sweatshirt! lol) Of course, you could just finish the tie ends with Fray-check…

I pinned the ties to the inside of the sweatshirt in preparation for sewing. Be sure to attach the long tie to the side opposite the eyelet!

See? Long tie goes on the side OPPOSITE to the side with the eyelet! I then stitched the ties to the sweatshirt.

HORRAH! With the ties attached, it was time to wrap that front! The long tie went under the wrap front, out the eyelet, across the back of the sweatshirt, and tied with the shorter tie at the side of the sweatshirt!

Time for some super comfy stylishness!

Now, there’s no need to tell people just how comfortable you are in this outfit. Or that you’re basically wearing a giant sweatshirt. You enjoy that comfy fashion statement, and no one has to know… 🙂

Heart On Your Sleeve Stamped T’s and Cards

Heart On Your Sleeve Stamped T’s and Cards

Valentine’s Day is such a great excuse for crafting! In our last post, we made fun DIY gifts for our Galentine’s friends. Today’s post, however, is all about making your own holiday gear! I used a favorite paint stamping technique to give a plain T-shirt some “heart”! You can use this same method to create looks for different holidays and seasons! (Check out some of our favorite projects here, here, and here!) Don’t worry- this craft is GREAT for gifts, but start by making one for YOU!

Begin by gathering the supplies for your heart stamp. I used tiny foam hearts from the kid’s craft section, a plastic soda cap, and my trusty E6000 glue. (While making the stamp, you can wash and dry your T-shirt. This ensures that the shirt won’t shrink too much after being painted!)

I used two matching hearts for this stamp.

I glued the first heart to the cap, then glued the second heart right on top of the first heart. I did this in order to add a little bit of thickness to the heart. Later on, this will make it easier to apply paint to the heart without getting paint on the cap.

The edges of the hearts wanted to curl up, so I placed a plate on top of the stamp while the glue dried.

Once you’ve made your stamp, check out this post for step-by-step instructions for preparing and stamping your shirt! If you want to make your own stamp in another shape, check out this stamp making tutorial!

I chose rainbow colors for my T-shirt since I love the color combination and because I wanted to make the shirt multi-seasonal! Ta-DA!

Those rainbow hearts helped brighten a super rainy day!

These earrings from last week’s post were the perfect accessory! Guess I have to keep this pair for myself. 😉

Before cleaning up my supplies, I used leftover paint to stamp hearts onto plain cards!

I *love* the rainbow colors against the brown cards! Will definitely save some of these for Valentine’s Day!

Ok, Partners in Craft, get out there and brighten the day with some paint and Valentine’s stamps! Go ahead and put your “heart” into it! 😉 Here are some supplies to get you started!

Holiday Accessories: 1940’s Style!

Holiday Accessories: 1940’s Style!

Merry Christmas, Everyone! To celebrate, I’m sprucing up a refashioned dress with homemade accessories, just like they might have done in the 1940’s! I searched my craft store for vintagey silk poinsettias and holly, shoe clips, pin backings, hair clips, felt, and glue!

I tackled the shoe clips first! I started by trimming the poinsettia “stems” so that the flowers could be glued to the shoe clips. I then applied E6000 glue to the clips, placed them on the back side of the flowers, and allowed the glue to dry for several hours.

Next, it was time to make the corsage! (1940’s ladies loved their corsages, both those with real flowers and the homemade kind!) I cut two ovals of coordinating felt to act as the base of the arrangement. The two ovals were glued together to make them sturdier.

Once the base was glued together, I trimmed the holy and poinsettias to fit the base. I used hot glue to attach first the holly and then the poinsettias.

Time to attach the pin backing! First, I used hot glue to glue the backing to the felt base. Next, I glued a small piece of felt across the backing and onto the base behind to add stability.



No 1940’s gal would have ended this project without making a matching hair accessory! The process for hair clip creation was very similar to making the corsage, only with a smaller base.

I paired my new accessories with a favorite dress I had refashioned in our DIY Fashion: 1980’s to 1940’s Dress post! (Check out the before and after pictures!!) 

My snood hair net was another fun project from our DIY 1940’s Snood Hair Net tutorial! Those adorable wreath earrings are a thrift store score! 

I think gals in the war years of the 40’s would have done projects alot like this in order to refashion old clothes and then use accessories to fancy them up! 

Time to get out your swingin’ holiday style! 🙂

Plaid Dress Re-Fashion!

Plaid Dress Re-Fashion!

I will admit that this dress was a bit of a project. I attempted the transformation for a couple of reasons. Firstly, I loooved the fabric! Yellow plaid flannel?! Whoa! Secondly, and very importantly, the dress was basically free. I found it while sifting through clothes at a stuff-a-bag-for-$5 rummage sale. Couldn’t go wrong, right?

At least the first step to dress improvement was simple. Remove those shoulder pads!

Since the dress came from a rummage sale, I wasn’t able to try it on until I got home. Upon try-on, I discovered that the cinched waist was a bit too tight and actually hit me below the waist at a poochy place. Uncomfortable!

I found that the waist cinch was created by a band of elastic encased in a tube of fabric. Using a thread ripper, I open the tube so that I could removed the elastic.

Once the elastic had been cut out, I had to re-sew the tube closed so that the waist wouldn’t hang strangely. In the picture, the tube to the left of my finger is still open. To the right of my finger, however, the tube has been re-stitched closed.

The next step was to trim down those huge sleeves! I realized that the shoulder seam was actually long enough to become a cap sleeve for me. I marked 2 inches from this seam to create a seam allowance.

I cut along my marks to remove the sleeves.

I tried on the dress and realized that the waist was still lower than my waist. In an attempt to fix that, I raised the shoulder seams. I used a ruler and disappearing pen to mark where the new seams should be.

After pinning, I stitched along the line I had drawn.

I laid the dress out flat, removing the wrinkles as much as possible. I then pinned the front and back of the bodice together so that they wouldn’t move, and then I folded the dress in half.

I placed an existing dress on top to use as a pattern. The pattern dress had a similar style and was of a similarly non-stretchy fabric as the flannel dress. It was also important that the pattern dress have a somewhat roomy fit, since I did NOT want to cut the flannel dress too small!

As a added precaution, I traced about an inch and a half extra around the pattern dress. I then cut according to my marks.

I pinned the side seams and stitched them closed, leaving the sleeve area open. (I will want to fiddle with those sleeves later.) Ta-da! The dress is getting whittled down to size!

After trying on the dress again to test the alterations, I moved on to hemming the sleeves. I rolled the hems, pinned them in place, and stitched. I also extended the side seams up into the hemmed sleeves.

Finally, the top part of the dress was fitting better. I left the skirt alone, since I liked the fullness and length! (I also didn’t want to mess with that button placket extending from the bodice to the skirt!)

I decided to try the dress with some fall layering! A wide belt helped adjust the waist, while lace-up boots and a plaid beret added highland flare.

The dress turned out to be super comfy and somewhat warm, due to all that fabulous flannel!

I played with the color skeme a bit by adding a thrifted corduroy jacket and vintage purse. I love how both pieces coordinated with my beret, which came courtesy of Scotland!

Freezer Paper Stenciling

Freezer Paper Stenciling

Customized T-shirt are some of our favorite projects, and what better excuse to make shirts than our Blogiversary?! Yes, our blog has officially turned one! Cue the music and bring on the cupcakes! Make the fanclub shirts and wear them shamelessly! Wha-hoo! 🙂

In order to make our shamelessly-worn-fanclub-shirts, we turned to a favorite technique, the use of freezer paper stencils! Freezer paper looks alot like wax paper and can often be found near the foil and plastic wrap at the store. Making stencils from freezer paper, while time consuming, allows you to get relatively professional-looking results for your fabric paint money. Once you cut a stencil from freezer paper, you can iron the paper to fabric and cause it to stick! When you apply paint to the stencil, the paint will only be able to stick to the fabric exposed by the stencil. The freezer paper will later be pealed up and removed, leaving the painted fabric underneath. There are lots of fun painting ideas available on Pinterest, but this tutorial was what first inspired me to give it a try! After making many shirts, I have developed a few tips for gaining that hard-worked-for professional look. Here’s what works for me! 🙂

Firstly, gather your supplies:

  • freezer paper
  • template 
  • masking tape
  • x-acto knife and/or small scissors
  • cutting board
  • iron and ironing board
  • fabric paint
  • paint sponge applicator
  • T-shirt- washed and dried
  • drop cloth.

As always, I washed and dried my t-shirt before doing any work on it. I then designed my template in a word processing program and printed it out.

Next, I cut a sheet of freezer paper a little bigger than my template. I laid the front of my template onto the SHINY side of the freezer paper. (The shiny side is what will eventually be ironed onto the fabric.) Recap: Front of template touches shiny side of freezer paper.

Tape that template down!

Flip the papers over so that the freezer paper is on top, while the template is readable underneath. (The dull side of the freezer paper should be facing you.)

Next, I used an x-acto knife and scissors to cut out the shapes and words. This takes patience, but a more accurate stencil will yield neater results.

Be sure to save the small freezer paper cut-outs from letters like “o” and “a.” We will replace those shapes back into the letters when the stencil is ironed to the shirt. Once the words have been cut out, cut the freezer paper down to the size of the paper stencil behind it. Note: Don’t miss this step! You will need the stencil to be a symmetrical shape for the next steps! You can remove any left-over masking tape.

Next, we need to ensure that the stencil will be ironed to the shirt with the proper orientation and alignment. These next steps show my way to find reference points on the shirt to help me line up the stencil. These steps don’t ensure perfection, but they lead to much better results than simply “eye-balling” the stencil’s placement! Note: Very cheap t-shirts have a tendency to shrink and warp in the wash. A higher quality shirt should be easier to work with! Start by folding the shirt in half, smoothing out any wrinkels, and marking along the center fold. This will give us a vertical line of reference. (I used a disappearing ink pen from my sewing stash for this part.)


Lay the garment as flat and straight as possible so that you can create horizontal reference points.  One way to do this is to place a rule from armpit seam to arm pit seam. Mark this line with the disappearing pen. Another horizontal line can be drawn from the top of each shoulder seam.

Next, measure the bottom hem and find the middle point.

Place a ruler between this point and the center of the neckline to make another vertical reference line. This line may differ slightly from the one drawn when the shirt was folded in half and can help you double check its accuracy.

Now that the shirt is marked, I also marked the middle points of each side of my stencil. It’s a bit hard to see in the picture, but I marked these points on the stencil with a Sharpie. Once that was done, I could then align these points with the reference lines on the shirt! Yay for a centered stencil!! (Be sure to do a visual double check to see if the stencil appears straight!)

Use a little masking tape to secure the stencil to the garment in the correct orientation. 

It’s finally time to iron the stencil to the shirt! I usually start ironing at one side of the stencil and work across. Once the stencil is secured in place, though, you can remove the masking tape so that you don’t accidentally iron it! Carefully iron down the edges of all the letters and shapes. You don’t want any paint to be able to leak under the edges of the stencil!

Once the letters are ironed down, add the small cut-outs that you saved from letters with inner shapes. Place these shiny-side-down, then use the tip of the iron to gently iron them in place.

Hurray! Now it’s time for painting! I use Soft fabric paint from Tulip, because this paint does not become bumpy or crunchy. I applied the paint with one of my painting sponges, but a foam applicator would work nicely. Before painting, line the shirt with cardboard, freezer paper, or wax paper to prevent the paint from bleeding through to the back of the shirt. Of course, don’t forget to protect your work surface with a drop cloth!

 Sponge the paint all over the cut-outs of the stencil, making sure all the details are covered in paint. For my shirt, I let the paint dry for at least half before adding a second coat. I wanted to ensure that my letter would be opaque and vibrant.

After waiting a several hours for the paint to dry, it’s time to remove the stencil! Carefully peal up the edges of the freezer paper and remove any small pieces!

Ta-DA! 

I was so excited about these shirts that I even made one for my husband! It was the least I could do considering all the photos he has taken for me! Of course, Lindee had to get in on the action too! 

We heart custom shirts and Partnersincraft.com! 🙂 Happy Blogiversary!

Costume Time: Across the Decades!

Costume Time: Across the Decades!

Halloween is almost here! Today we are showcasing some of our favorite costumes from across the decades! Click on each photo to see the whole post and outfit DIY!

Happy costuming, Everyone!

Costume Time: 1920’s Style!

Costume Time: 1920’s Style!

I used the think that 1920’s costumes were challenging to create. Over time, I have found that it’s very possible to turn thrift store garments into “mod” looks! Today’s post features some of our favorite 1920’s outfits and a range of crafting commitment. Bring on the flapper flair!

I was so excited about these first outfits, that Lindee was given no choice but to do a photo shoot with me! The drop-waist dresses from the 1980’s required next to no alteration, other than the mandatory removal of shoulder pads.  The addition of a sash and flower pin were totally optional.

Less optional were the long necklaces (Lindee’s was actually two strands of pearls of different lengths), cloche hats, and vintagy shoes. You can find links to similar items at the bottom of this post!

These dresses were surprisingly comfortable and fun to wear!

Even our photographer got into the act!

Of course, you may recognize the blue dress from our earlier post “Vintage a la Thrift Store: 1920’s“! A faux fur wrap from the thrift store and some wooly tights added warmth on a cold day.

For a more formal evening look, check out Lindee’s transformation of a plain dress into fabulous flapper duds in our post “DIY 1920’s Costume“! Fabulous, Dahling, Fabulous!

If you can’t find a drop-waist dress, you can make your own from an over-sized shirt and coordinating fabric! Our post “1920’s Dress from Polo Shirt” will show you the step-by-step process! For these pictures, I channeled my inner “modern” and had *fun* with contrasting accessories and lipstick!

We love the 1920’s!

Here are some fun 1920’s-inspired accessories to get you started!

1920’s Dress from Polo Shirt

1920’s Dress from Polo Shirt

I *love* re-fashioning thrift store staples into unique, historically-inspired outfits! Oversized polo shirts are ideal for such projects, since they are easy to find and are practically dresses already! With the addition of some coordinating fabric and elbow grease, my polo shirt will become a drop-waist dress inspired by the 1920’s. Calling all flappers: it’s time to get sewing!

Step 1: Find a big men’s polo shirt at your local thrift store. The longer the shirt, the better! Look for a shirt that is a color/pattern that can easily coordinate with other fabric. Also watch out for stains and signs of noticeable wear. Step 1.5: Goofily pose in your shirt after washing it!

 Gather a skirt-sized piece of coordinating fabric, and make sure it is washed and somewhat wrinkle-free. This fabric will become the “skirt” part of the drop-waist dress.  Lay your shirt out flat and smooth out the wrinkles (iron if necessary).


Now it’s time to re-fashion that polo! I folded the shirt in half, being careful to smooth out all wrinkles. I pinned the side and shoulder seams to keep the fabric from moving around.

Next, I got out a loosely-fitting Tshirt  to use as a pattern. A word of warning: DO NOT use a snug or even perfectly-fitting shirt as a pattern, or you will cut your polo shirt too small! This dress is meant to hang loosely on the body, so cut bigger than you think you will need. (Learn from the voice of experience, People!) You can see in the picture that I measured about 2 inches of EXTRA fabric around the body of the T shirt before cutting the polo. I did cut off most of the polo’s sleeves.

Next, I needed do some prep work before hemming the side seams of the polo. First, I used the Tshirt to help me guess how high the side seams should be sewn under the arm. I marked this with fabric chalk. I also measured several inches up from the bottom hem of the shirt and marked this spot on both side seams. This marking will remind me to not stitch all the way to the bottom of the shirt.

I sewed the side seams using a large, loose stitch and standard seam allowances. (Be sure to use the right kind of needle for your fabric, which in my case was knit!) I stopped stitching several inches from the bottom of the shirt, as I had marked off earlier. I tried on the shirt, and found that it was too big and the seams needed to go higher under the arms. I used rulers and chalk to measure where I thought the seams needed to be. As before, I sewed the seems and tried on the shirt. Better this time!

During all this trying on, I found that the sleeves were way too long. I left about an inch of sleeve beyond the shoulder seam, then cut the rest off.

After another just-to-double-check-try-on, I determined where the finalized side seams should be. I then stitched the seams using a stitch designed to both bind and serge the seams in knit fabric. In the picture, you can see how many tries it took me before I liked the placement of the seam! You can trim some of the extra fabric off after you sew the final seam.

Once the shirt portion of the dress fit, I turned my attention to the skirt. I laid the two pieces of skirt fabric out flat, then folded the double layer in half. I lined up this skirt fabric with the folded shirt. I cut the skirt so that it began the same width as the bottom of the shirt, and then increased to a slight a-line towards the hem.

Here are the skirt pieces once cut. (The pieces appear to be slightly different sizes in the picture, but they are actually the same.)

Next, I pinned the skirt pieces to the bottom hems of the shirt. One skirt piece got pinned to the shirt front, the other to the shirt back. (Remember: the side seams of the shirt were not yet stitched all the way to the bottom of the shirt. This allowed me to work with the front and back of the shirt individually, since they were not fully attached to each other.) I liked the look of the shirt’s hem, so I kept that as a flap with the skirt pinned behind it.

I pinned and stitched the skirt pieces to the shirt pieces. 

With the skirt pieces sewn to the shirt, it was finally time to extend the side seams all the way to the hem of the skirt. I pinned and sewed!

After trying on the dress, I decided to shorten the skirt a couple inches so that it reached right below my knee. I saved the trimmed fabric for later use!

Now to finish those sleeves. I simply folder under the extra fabric extending beyond the shoulder seam and pinned it in place. Stitched that in place and the “sleeve” was done.

I had just enough fabric trimmings left to make a couple accessories! (Nothing like some custom detailing to make a re-made dress look vintage!) The strip of gray fabric became a sailor-like necktie. The blue circles would morph into a flower that could be clipped to my hat.

I cut out petals from the circles and cut small pieces of black felt for the backing. I stacked the flowers from largest to smallest, attaching each new flower layer with hot glue.

A cute lil’ button became the center of the flower, while a piece from the shirt’s hem acted as leaves.


The circle of felt became the base of the flower, while the rectangle secured the hair clip to the base.  I used my E6000 glue to attach the hair clip to the felt.

I couldn’t wait to style my newly-made dress! The addition of my favorite cloche hat and vintage-y shoes completed the look!

Find similar styles (here)!
And here!

Of course, I also added my homemade accessories and a LOT of eyeliner! Check out this historically-inspired 1920’s makeup tutorial (here) for more ideas! Much fun!

This 1920’s outfit makes me want to dance!

Hey, Flappers! Who’s ready for a polo shirt dance party?!

Make A Statement: Painted Denim Jacket

Make A Statement: Painted Denim Jacket

Recently, I have been inspired by statement jackets and decided to paint my own as the perfect adition to my back to school wardrobe. This oversized denim jacket used to be my dad’s but he let me steal it from the coat closet. If you are looking for a denim jacket to make your own, check out your local Goodwill and don’t forget to check the guy’s section (endless oversized treasures have been found there).

Supplies

  • Denim Jacket
  • Fabric Paint
  • Paint Brushes
  • Fabric Pen
  • Trash bags, paper bag, or anything that will protect your work surface from fabric paint.
  • Pinterest board where you can gather inspiration (check out my inspiration linked here: http://www.pinterest.com/eyre0482/my-painted-jacket/

Make sure to put something inbetween the front and the back of the jacket so paint does not bleed onto the opposite side. I decided to use the lines of the sems to frame my painting.

To get the colors to be very vibrant, I had to add a layer of white paint as a base.

Tracing around the letters with a black fabric pen really helped them stand out and look clean around the edges. I didn’t use stencils or stamps, I just free handed the whole thing using pictures as references. Whether you trace everything out first or just go with the flow, making a statement jacket is all about your creative process and what calls to you. Have fun with it! I certainly did!

Check out Britt’s statement jacket incorporating both patches and stamping from our past blog post Basic to Trendy- Patches (found here)!

Ice Dye: Apartment Edition

Ice Dye: Apartment Edition

Britt and I have a tradition of tye dying almost every year. This summer we decided to attempt it at Britt’s apartment… Instead of doing pots of dye on the stove or in buckets outside, we discovered ice dying, which was a new technique for us. We decided to try it out and see if it was more suitable for apartment-sized crafting than our usual dying method. With our new found inspiration, we set out to see how big of a mess we could make in Brit’s car port.

We found some great istructions from Brit+Co. Check out this bloggers post for more inspiration. https://www.brit.co/how-to-ice-tie-dye/

Supplies

  • Tarp
  • Rubber gloves
  • Paper towel
  • Scissors
  • Tin pans with plastic lids
  • Cookie racks
  • 1 lb. Soda Ash (We bought ours from Amazon via this link. )
  • Rit Dye (We also tried a polyester dye for a poly/cotton blend scarf… it didn’t work as well.)
  • Ice
  • Ruber bands (You only need these if you want to do starbursts or to tie up the fabric to produce a certain pattern).
  • Clothing to dye

Step 1: Soda Ash

We started by dissolving a package of soda ash in a couple of gallons of water. The package of soda ash should say how much to add for water volume. Then for an hour, we soaked the clothing and fabric in soda ash as a fixative for the dye.

Step 2: Stabby stab!

We used scissors to poke holes into the plastic lid that accompanied the tin pans. This allows water to drain into the tin pan as the ice melts.

Step 3 – Optional

I love starbursts so I used tiny hair rubber bands to create them around the bottom of some shirts I was dying.

Step 4: Assemble materials!

We placed the plastic lids on the tin pans. The we put cookie racks over the tin pans that didn’t have lids.

The red package of polyester dye did not work!

Step 6: Arrange fabric and add ice.

We used one bag of store bought ice. When I ice dyed sheets a few weeks later, I needed a lot more. When in doubt, just get more ice!

Step 7: It’s time to dye.

We opened the packages of dye and shook the powder onto the ice. There isn’t really a specific method for this part, have fun!

We ended up leaving the ice to melt over night. When I dyed sheets back at home a few weeks later, I left the dye sitting for 3 hours.

In the morning we collected our ice dyed goodies from the car port and put them in the wash.

Results!

Tote bags

The dye had a harder time melting through and getting both side of thicker material like the tote bags and a pair of shorts. Still turned out pretty cool but it is something to take note of.

We hit the beach rocking our new ice dyed clothing!

We fit right in at Brit’s local market.

Clean Up!

We washed the tin pans and cookie racks in the bathtub so I could take them home and do some ice dying with my friends! (The dye water dyed the soap scum in the tub, but did not dye the actual tub because we scrubbed it clean as soon as possible. Your tub might retain dye if it is old and/or cracked. If in doubt, you can do this step outside.) We used a hose outside to wash the tarp. Relatively easy and quick clean up!

Britt and I have deemed this project appartment friendly! I had so much fun ice dying that when I returned home I ice dyed some sheets to remake into curtains. Check out my post on ice dyed curtains here: https://partnersincraft.com/ice-dyed-curtains/